KOEL Stories

Simply Bulky Woven Wall Hanging With Jennifer Clark

KOEL Stories

Being a seeker of modern yarn crafting tools and supplies, we immediately fell head over heels Jenny’s (owner of Sonora Handmade) acrylic lap looms and weaving tools when we first caught eyes on them. Her looms are the epitome of koelness, which comes in so many fun colors (including our favourite: the hot pink!). Apart from being a fan of her tools, we are all praise for Jenny’s clever use of rovings in her work. So of course, we couldn’t let this koel kid off without having her contribute a DIY weaving pattern. This Simple Bulky Woven Wall Hanging is perfect for beginners who are interested in experimenting with bulkier yarns. So give it a try and share with us your creations by tagging @koelmagazine on Instagram!

Yarns Used
2oz. Ashland Bay Cream merino wool roving
1oz. Ashland Bay Vanilla merino wool roving
1oz. Ashland Bay Citron merino wool roving
1oz. Ashland Bay Pewter merino wool roving
1 skein of bulky cream merino wool yarn
1 small skein of black wool yarn, worsted weight

Tools & Materials
16 x 20cm framed weaving loom or larger
Scissors
Weaving needle
Tapestry needle
Acrylic rod or branch

Instructions
Begin:
Double warp the loom using black wool yarn. You should have 44 warp threads in total. This pattern is done using three basic weaving techniques: tabby weave, soumak weave and rya knots. For the chunky roving, you will have to decrease the length of your soumak weave stitch with each color, for a “stair - stepped” look.

Continue:
Step 1: After you have warped your loom, prepare your weaving needle with the bulky cream merino wool yarn and tabby weave 13 rows.

Step 2: Using Cream Roving, soumak weave 4 rows. The soumak stitch should be done over two warp threads, which will give the soumak weave a bulky look. Begin at the left of your loom, and soumak weave to the right, and return back to the left where you started. Complete this weave and return, twice. This should give you four rows of soumak when done.

Step 3: Using the Citron Roving, begin at the left of the loom and complete one partial row of soumak weave, until you reach the 34th vertical warp thread. The soumak stitch should be done over two warp threads, which will give the soumak weave a bulky look. Return back to the left again with the soumak weave.

Step 4: Using the Pewter Roving, begin at the left of the loom and complete one partial row of soumak weave, until you reach the 30th vertical warp thread. The soumak stitch should be done over two warp threads, which will give the soumak weave a bulky look. Return back to the left again with the soumak weave.

Step 5: Using the Vanilla Roving, begin at the left of the loom and complete one partial row of soumak weave, until you reach the 22nd vertical warp thread. The soumak stitch should be done over two warp threads, which will give the soumak weave a bulky look. Return back to the left again with the soumak weave.

Step 6: Fill the remaining weave with tabby weave for the entire piece. Begin just under the Cream Roving, and continue to horizontally add rows until you have filled in all the space next to the soumak roving. Continue to tabby weave an additional 32 horizontal rows, which will give approximately another 6 inches of length to your piece.

Step 7: Using the remaining bulky cream merino wool yarn, cut 66 pieces of yarn of approximately 30 inches in length each. Using three strands of yarn for each knot, tie 22 rya knots across the bottom of the piece.

Step 8: Tabby weave three rows underneath the rya knots for stability.

End: Cut and tie the warp together in groups of two across the bottom and top of the weave. Tuck the ends into the back of the weaving. Using the bulky cream merino wool yarn, secure the weaving to a rod or branch of your choice.

A Little About Jennifer Clark
Jenny is a passionate weaver based in sunny Scottsdale, Arizona. She launched Sonora Handmade in 2015, named after the birth of her daughter, Sonora. Sonora Handmade stocks modern weaving looms and tools, including Jenny’s signature acrylic lap looms designed and laser cut by her. She also teaches lap loom weaving workshops throughout Arizona for adults and children.

Follow Jennifer Clark: Instagram

DIY Crocheted Wall Hanging With M.L. Tran

Knit A Therapyirene hoofs

Introducing to you a new kid on the block for our Knit A Therapy column – M.L. Tran, more popularly known by her Instagram handle @minimyarnism. M.L.'s modern take on crochet with a strong focus on minimalistic design is what enthralled us to rope her into the KOEL club of pattern and DIY contributors. And just by scrolling through her aesthetically pleasing feed, you will know that she's one crochet technique expert too! 'Nuff said, let us entice you to get your hands crafty with M.L.'s Crocheted Wall Hanging pattern inspired by the sophisticated simplicity of macramé knots (who says we can't make a wall hanging out of crochet stitches!). Whether you are going for a minimalistic decor or not, this wall hanging will surly find a place in your home. So what are you waiting for? Start hooking away!

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I often find myself admiring the works of macrame artists and I'm certainly going to learn the craft one day. As a crocheter though, I seek to create a wall hanging that honors the sophisticated simplicity of macrame knots by using just crochet techniques. Anything is possible with a little imagination (yes?)! With this easy crochet pattern, you will be able to create a simple yet sophisticated wall hanging that will surely leave your fingers yearning to make more than just one! Experiment with different fibers and weights of yarn, and you may well create yourself a whole wall of crocheted wall decor.

Materials
1. 12 inch (~30.5 cm) wooden dowel
2. Bulky 5 yarn weight cotton blend yarn (I used Bernat Maker Home Dec in Cream)
3. I/9 or 5.5mm crochet hook
4. Yarn needle
5. Scissors

Abbreviations
ch - chain
sk - skip
hdc - half double crochet
dc - double crochet

Instructions
Begin:
With a tail long enough for wrapping the wooden dowel and for hanging (about 20 inches, or ~51 cm total), make a slip knot.

Row 1: Ch 29, hdc into 5th ch from hook, *ch1, sk1, hdc into next ch, repeat from * to the last ch, turn.

Row 2: Ch 2 (count as hdc), *hdc into next ch space, ch1, sk next hdc, repeat from * until last ch space, hdc into last ch space, ch1, dc into the same ch space, turn.

Row 3: Ch 3, hdc into first ch space, *ch1, sk next hdc, hdc into next ch space, repeat from * until the turning ch, hdc into the turning ch, turn.

Rows 4-9: Repeat rows 2 and 3.

Row 10: Ch 2 (count as hdc), hdc into first ch space, *ch1, sk next hdc, hdc into next ch space, repeat from * until last ch space, sk last hdc, hdc into top of the turning ch, turn.

Row 11: Ch 2, sk first hdc, *hdc into next ch space, ch1, sk next hdc, repeat from * until the turning ch, hdc into the turning ch, turn.

Rows 12-17: Repeat rows 10 and 11.

Row 18: Repeat row 10, fasten off and weave in ends.

Wrap beginning tail end around the wooden dowel, while weaving evenly along the top edge of your wall hanging. Use remaining yarn end to hang and fasten at corner. Weave in ends to secure.

Tassels: Cut 18 strands of yarn each about 36 inches (~91 cm) in length. Fold each strand in half and wrap folded end through the bottom edge of your wall hanging, making sure they are evenly spaced. Trim bottom ends for a neat finish.

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A Little About M.L. Tran: M.L. has always been in love with crafting and design. She has been crocheting since a child when her late grandmother first taught her, but it wasn’t until she made a crochet blanket for her newborn niece did her passion for it blossomed. She loves to keep things simple, from her life to work, design and photography as she believes that it is the simple things in life that matter most. Her modern, minimalist style and eye for clean, elegant design is what motivates her to inspire others in similar ways, whether it is in their craft or life. She currently works as a stationery designer by day in Houston, Texas, where she lives with her husband, and spends the rest of her time combining her love for craft and design into what is now known as her signature brand, MINIMYARNISM.

Follow M.L. Tran: Instagram | Pinterest

DIY Arm Knitted Chunky Vase with Anne Weil

Knit A Therapyirene hoofs

We are back with yet another arm knitting DIY from craft expert, Anne Weil of Flax and Twine! If you haven't dabbled into arm knitting, this tutorial will convince you how fast you can create a beautiful piece without landing your hands on those needles. Anne amazes us again with a chunky vase DIY that is sure to be the centre piece of your living room! Read on for full tutorial.

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For a incredible statement piece, arm knit this stunning vase in less than 30 minutes! The plush texture of the knit stands in vivid contrast to the flowers, foliage and surrounding decor. Learning to arm knit takes little time, and there's so much fabulous fun to have with this technique. Drop those enormous needles and simplify your chunky knits. I promise you’ll thank me (: Go big with this one, too! Imagine your next event surrounded by these striking vases – they are sure to wow!

Materials
1. 10” height x 5” diameter vase
2. 35-40 yards of jumbo specialty yarn held double (use a jumbo specialty yarn that gets approximately 1/2 to 1 stitch to the inch on traditional needles)

Yarn Used
1. A ball of LoveFest Fibers Tough Love, 50 yards, 100% New Zealand Wool in Bright Buttercup

Note: This project can be done with less expensive yarn. If the jumbo specialty yarn is out of your budget, simply replace EACH strand of jumbo yarn with 2-3 strands of a super bulky yarn that you buy in your craft or local yarn store.

Techniques
*This pattern assumes that you know the basics of Arm Knitting1. Arm Knitting How To (Instruction Sheet Downloadable here) 2. How to Purl in Arm Knitting (Instruction Sheet Downloadable here)

A purl stitch is the reverse side of a knit stitch. When you purl, you create a knit stitch on the opposite side of the fabric. In arm knitting, to create a garter stitch, you need to purl one row and knit one row, because you never turn the work around!

To create a purl stitch, moving from the left arm to the right (1), bring the working yarn right behind the first stitch on your arm (2). Let it rest there. Reach through the first stitch and grab the working yarn (3). Bring that loop of working yarn through the stitch, while pulling the stitch off your hand. Insert your hand through the loop, moving your hand away from your body (4). The working yarn should extend from the front of your arm (5) (even though the working yarn hangs at the back of the work). Tighten stitch and repeat process for each stitch in row.

KOEL Stories | DIY Arm Knitted Chunky Vase with Anne Weil
KOEL Stories | DIY Arm Knitted Chunky Vase with Anne Weil

Instructions
Begin: 
Cast On 6 stitches

Continue: 
Row 1: Knit. Row 2: Purl. Repeat Rows 1 & 2, four more times. Knit one row. Bind off while purling. Cut end with 1.5 yards remaining. Pull cut end through the last loop (A).

Finishing:
Place piece with bound of edge to your left, and cast on edge to the right (B).

Fold ends towards one another. Using the remaining length allowed for seaming, go back and forth from side to side bringing the seaming yarn under the outer most loop/leg of the left side, then under the stitch on the right (C).  At the end of the seam, weave all ends into the vase cover, and tuck to the inside. Insert the vase into the knit cylinder (D).

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A Little About Anne
Anne Weil is the creative voice behind Flax and Twine. A lover of beautiful things, she’s never met a craft she doesn’t like. Anne designs charming knit, crochet and embroidery patterns, as well as simple DIY crafts for the modern maker. Her signature style is bright and clean, with gorgeous photography and step-by-step instructions that can be followed with ease.

Find Anne’s book, “Knitting Without Needles,” a Potter Craft title, to immerse yourself in chunky, stylish arm and  finger knit patterns. Find Anne in her Denver studio relishing joyful making moments that really make her heart sing!

Follow Anne: Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

DIY Finger Knitting Trimmed Pillows with Anne Weil

Knit A Therapyirene hoofs

At KOEL, we want to encourage a lifestyle of making and crafting. We want you to get your hands dirty with projects, and for you to produce works you love and have lovingly made. Dabbling into a life filled with creativity hones in on your skills and talent, and truthfully, it’s an awesome form of escape! Don’t you agree? Our new DIY column, Knit A Therapy, will do just that for you. We’re inviting talented crafters to share the joy of a handmade life with you!

It was a unanimous decision to have Anne Weil, of Flax and Twine, kick things off for us! Flax and Twine is best known for her friendly DIY tutorials, and we absolutely love her finger knit and arm knit projects! We are super thrilled to have Flax and Twine join the KOEL club. Presenting to you, a Finger Knitting Trimmed Pillows tutorial — just what you need to introduce small changes to the home! We shall now hand it over to Anne to talk you through this project. Over to you Anne!

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I’m in love with this simple and easy finger knitting pillow trim. What a pretty and clean way to bring a handmade touch and a chunky knit feel to your decor. Finger knitting is fun and uncomplicated – great for folks who have never knit before and a nice change for experienced knitters.  Finger knitting is effortless to learn and very addictive. It is a a great way to make something beautiful with your children as well. Kids pick up finger knitting with ease. You’ll be clamoring for more projects before you know it!  I’ve included a pillow with finger knitting trim done on two fingers, and one with it done on four fingers. One is made with t-shirt yarn, and the other with a wool blend yarn. Try  different combinations of materials and pillow sizes and types for lots of knitting enjoyment.

Materials
1.. How To Finger Knit – Four Fingers and Two Fingers Instruction Sheet (Downloadable here)
2. Pillow of any size (I find it easier to buy pillows in a desired color already finished at a home goods store, but you can always buy fabric and an insert and make your own custom cover.)
3. Approximately 20 to 40 yards of worsted weight yarn (size 4 in craft stores), depending on pillow size. (For pink pillow, I used  HiKoo’s Tee Cakes in pink. For green pillow, I used Fiber & Co’s Terra in Mint)
4. Needle
5. Thread
6. Scissors
7. Pins

Instructions
1. Finger knit either a four-finger width (green) or two-finger width (pink) finger knitting strand long enough to go around all the edges of your pillow. Don’t finish your strand yet, as you may have excess after you attach the strand to your pillow. Stick a pencil or large safety pin in the open stitches to keep the strand from unraveling.

2. Pin the finger knitting strand all the way around pillow, making an effort to keep the strand untwisted.

3. Using needle and thread doubled up, stitch down finger knit strand to pillow along the seam.  Catch only one edge stitch of the strand at a time, making an effort to keep the stitch you are catching all in the same line of stitches.  Doing this will keep the strand from twisting.

4. When you bet back to the beginning of your pillow, unravel the remaining finger knitting strand until it will meet at the corner of the pillow.

5. You will have the loops or stitches of the strand free.  Cut the length of yarn with about 8” to spare.

6. Feed this tail through all the open loops of the finger knitting and tighten.  Tack down the final bit of strand with needle and thread and trim and weave all yarn tails to hide them in the border.  Fluff and arrange the strand for a nice border around the pillow.

And that’s it! You’ve got finger knitted trimmings around your pillow. We think this would also make a super lovely project as Autumn approaches — change up the colors of your thread to suit the season! Take a picture and tag us @koelmagazine #KnitATherapy when you upload it onto Instagram!

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A Little About Anne
nne Weil is the creative voice behind Flax and Twine. A lover of beautiful things, she’s never met a craft she doesn’t like. Anne designs charming knit, crochet and embroidery patterns, as well as simple DIY crafts for the modern maker. Her signature style is bright and clean, with gorgeous photography and step-by-step instructions that can be followed with ease.

Find Anne’s book, “Knitting Without Needles,” a Potter Craft title, to immerse yourself in chunky, stylish arm and  finger knit patterns. Find Anne in her Denver studio relishing joyful making moments that really make her heart sing!

Follow Anne: Facebook | Twitter | Instagram